Squishy Science Experiment With Warblettes

Kids love to learn with their hands. Warblettes, also known as water beads or water marbles, are a fun science experiment that thrills all ages. In this lab, your children will observe the exciting change from small, hard beads to marble-sized, squishy balls.

NOTE: Warblettes are a polymer that absorb water. Like crayons, Warblettes are nontoxic but not meant for eating.

The Experiment

Observe the Warblettes before you put them in water. How do they feel? Measure the diameter: how small are they? (Warning: if you use colored Warblettes, you’re likely to get some food coloring on your fingers.) Use these printable lab sheets to make observations.

Put 1 teaspoon of Warblettes in 2 cups of water. What happens? (Colored Warblettes will color the water. The Warblettes instantly begin absorbing water.)

After 4-6 hours, the Warblettes will have absorbed the maximum amount of water. What observations can you make now?

Expanding the Experiment

If you find your kids love Warblettes and want to learn more, try:

  • Observing the effects of dehydration: do they shrink to the original size? How long does it take to shrink in the sun? In the shade? Does spreading them out affect the dehydration rate?
  • Testing the effects of cold and hot water on absorption.
  • Graphing the diameter of Warblettes as they grow (measure every 15 minutes or so).
  • Putting Warblettes in various household liquids, like soap or salt water, to see if they will grow.
  • The Warblette Activity Book has even more experiments covering polymers, light refraction, kinetic energy, and more.

Adapting for Younger Children

This lab is geared toward elementary-aged students, but others will enjoy learning, too. A sensory bin with Warblettes would be a great way for the youngest group to explore. My toddler (2) and preschooler (4) love playing with and squishing Warblettes. Show your young scientists the Warblettes before and after water absorption. Encourage them to draw pictures of what they see on the observation page of the printable lab sheets.

Giveaway

Heath Scientific is giving away a tube of Warblettes in the color of your choice! (Choose from clear, blue, red, green, or yellow.) This experiment used approximately 1/6 of a tube. Enter the Rafflecopter contest below and be entered to win! PLEASE FOLLOW THE RAFFLECOPTER RULES! Click on the “Do it!” and follow the entry directions in order for your entry to count!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

_______________________________

Alicia Brown is a homeschooling mom who writes for Heath Scientific, which was founded by a science teacher dedicated to the idea that “A child looks at life with his hands.” Heath Scientific strives to provide scientific toys and supplies that encourage hands-on learning.

Comments

  1. 7

    says

    I {heart} all things science, but would love a few of the giant millipedes we saw on the site. My son has been intrigued by them since we saw them in a pet store a few years ago, and when I was finally ready to buy two, they stopped carrying them.

  2. 24

    Christina P says

    Oh my Heath Scientific has so much! A microscope & safety goggles are on my to-get list, and the potato clock & make a tin can robot look like fun projects.

  3. 27

    Catherine says

    I may be romanticizing my chemistry lab experiences…..but my kids NEED (read: I want them to have one) a bunsen burner, so that’s what I loved…..is Christmas here yet? That’s when we get our best supplies (microscope and telescope last year). But we love Warblettes too and would love to have a green tube.

  4. 34

    Sylvia says

    Another way to try with the older kids is to leave the already grown warblettes in an airtight container and add more when they dry out to see what kind of bacteria grows! I tried it out and the results are really interesting!

Trackbacks

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>